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Multimedia Monitoring Database (MMDB)

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posted on 23.11.2021, 17:37 by Kristin Isaacs, Jonathan Taylor Wall, Ashley R. Williams, Kevin A. Hobbie, Jon R. Sobus, Elin M. Ulrich, David Lyons, Kathie L. Dionisio, Antony WilliamsAntony Williams, Christopher M. Grulke, Caroline Foster, Charles Bevington

Direct monitoring of chemical concentrations in different environmental and biological media is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which human and ecological receptors are exposed to exogenous chemicals. Monitoring data provides evidence of chemical occurrence in different media and can be used to inform exposure assessments. The monitoring data provide required information for parameterization and evaluation of predictive models based on chemical uses, fate and transport, and release or emission processes. Finally, these data are useful in supporting regulatory chemical assessment and decision-making. There are a wide variety of public monitoring data available from existing government programs, historical efforts, public data repositories, and peer-reviewed literature databases. However, these data are difficult to access and analyze in a coordinated manner. Here, data from 20 individual public monitoring data sources were extracted, curated to unique chemical identifiers (EPA’s DSSTox Substance Identifiers, DTXSID) and medium identifiers (e.g., blood, drinking water, indoor air, ambient air, etc.) and harmonized into a sustainable machine-readable data format for support of exposure assessments. The database is provided here as a compressed MySQL dump, containing SQL statements that would recreate MMDB in its entirety.

Note that the full uncompressed size of this file is over 300 GB. Users should be aware of space requirements before uncompressing.

This database accompanies the publication “A Harmonized Chemical Monitoring Database for Support of Exposure Assessments”, by Isaacs K.K., Wall J.T., Williams A.R., Hobbie K.A., Sobus J.R., Ulrich E., Lyons D., Dionisio K.L., Williams A.J., Grulke C., Foster C.A., McCoy J., and Bevington C.

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